Copper Toxicity and Adrenal Fatigue: Your Adrenal Fix Podcast 29:

Copper Toxicity and Adrenal Fatigue are discussed

Topics: 

  1. Why there is a high likelihood that you are born with copper toxicity predisposing you to adrenal fatigue
  2. How our toxic environment can be a major contributor to your copper imbalance, and learn how to determine if this is a problem for you.
  3. Learn how important copper is in producing energy for many vital body functions, how to ensure you have the proper levels, and what the adrenals have to do with the entire process
  4. How adrenal fatigue leads to copper toxicity, which can impact mood, abnormal cycles, fungal infections, fatigue, and most importantly,
  5. what you can do to fix both your adrenal fatigue and copper regulation.

 

We all think about the adrenal glands as being our stress glands. While this is true, one of the major functions of the adrenal glands is maintaining and regulation of your mineral balance. According to Henry Schroeder, Ph.D., MD: “Minerals are the spark plugs of life.”

Simply put, minerals are necessary for energy production in your body. In turn, that energy is used to managing the stressors that occur in the body. Every enzymatic process involved in the creation of energy is dependent upon the nutrient minerals. Two times Nobel Prize winner Linus Pauling went so far as to state unequivocally: “You can trace every sickness, every disease, and every ailment to a mineral deficiency.”

 

Copper Excess Problems:

  1. Hormone Imbalances
  2. Joints Pains and Bone Diseases
  3. Chronic fatigue
  4. Estrogen Dominance

Copper is required to fix calcium in the bones and to build and repair all bones and all connective tissue. The right form of copper is needed to produce 30-40% of our energy.

Copper Excess Problems:

  1. Anxiety/Depression
  2. Cancer

Copper is needed for the neurotransmitter production of L-Dopa and noradrenaline.

Mg, K, Na, Zn Loss from Cells Under Stress or Copper Overload

  • Mg, K, Na, Zn are lost from inside of cells.
  • Mineral deficiency in cells.
  • Mineral increases in blood temporarily.
  • Hair follicle picks up excess mineral; shows high in TMA.
  • Blood carries lost minerals to kidneys.
  • Lost minerals are excreted in hair and urine.

Estrogen/Copper Connection:

  • Excess estrogen causes copper retention
  • Xenoestrogen exposure coupled with low levels of Magnesium, Zinc, Molybdenum, Manganese and Vitamin C leads to copper overload.